The New York Times(Nytimes.com) Covert Redirect Web Security Bug Based on Google Doubleclick.net

New-York-Times-office

(1) WebSite:

nytimes.com



“The New York Times (NYT) is an American daily newspaper, founded and continuously published in New York City since September 18, 1851, by the New York Times Company. It has won 117 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other news organization.

The paper’s print version has the largest circulation of any metropolitan newspaper in the United States, and the second-largest circulation overall, behind The Wall Street Journal. It is ranked 39th in the world by circulation. Following industry trends, its weekday circulation has fallen to fewer than one million daily since 1990. Nicknamed for years as “The Gray Lady”, The New York Times is long regarded within the industry as a national “newspaper of record”. It is owned by The New York Times Company. Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr., (whose family (Ochs-Sulzberger) has controlled the paper for five generations, since 1896), is both the paper’s publisher and the company’s chairman. Its international version, formerly the International Herald Tribune, is now called the International New York Times.” (Wikipedia)

(2) Vulnerability Description:

The New York Times web application has a computer cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Covert Redirect attacks.



The vulnerabilities can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (10.0.9200.16750) of Windows 8, Mozilla Firefox (34.0) & Google Chromium 39.0.2171.65-0 ubuntu0.14.04.1.1064 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04),Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X Lion 10.7.

The programming code flaw occurs at “adx_click.html?” page with “&goto” parameter, i.e.

http://www.nytimes.com/adx/bin/adx_click.html?type=goto&opzn&page=www.nytimes.com/pages/nyregion/index.html&pos=SFMiddle&sn2=8dfce1f6/9926f9b3&sn1=bbba504f/c0de9221&camp=CouplesResorts_1918341&ad=NYRegionSF_Feb_300x250-B5732328.10663001&goto=http%3A%2F%2Fad%2Edoubleclick%2Enet%2Fddm%2Fclk%2F279541164%3B106630011%3Bs%3Fhttp%3A%2F%2Ffacebook%2Ecom%2Fall%2Dinclusive%2Ephp%3Futm%5Fsource%3Dnyt%26utm%5Fmedium%3Ddisplay%26utm%5Fcontent%3Dclicktracker%26utm%5Fcampaign%3D300x250%5FExpectMore%5FNYT%5FNYRegion

(2.1) When a user is redirected from Nytimes to another site, Nytimes will check parameters “&sn1″ and “&sn2″. If the redirected URL’s domain is OK, Nytimes will allow the reidrection.

However, if the URLs in a redirected domain have open URL redirection vulnerabilities themselves, a user could be redirected from Nytimes to a vulnerable URL in that domain first and later be redirected from this vulnerable site to a malicious site. This is as if being redirected from Nytimes directly.

One of the vulnerable domain is,
doubleclick.net (Google’s Ad website)

(2.2) Use one of webpages for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://xingti.tumblr.com”. We can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

Vulnerable URL:
http://www.nytimes.com/adx/bin/adx_click.html?type=goto&opzn&page=www.nytimes.com/pages/nyregion/index.html&pos=SFMiddle&sn2=8dfce1f6/9926f9b3&sn1=bbba504f/c0de9221&camp=CouplesResorts_1918341&ad=NYRegionSF_Feb_300x250-B5732328.10663001&goto=http%3A%2F%2Fad%2Edoubleclick%2Enet%2Fddm%2Fclk%2F279541164%3B106630011%3Bs%3Fhttp%3A%2F%2Ffacebook%2Ecom%2Fall%2Dinclusive%2Ephp%3Futm%5Fsource%3Dnyt%26utm%5Fmedium%3Ddisplay%26utm%5Fcontent%3Dclicktracker%26utm%5Fcampaign%3D300x250%5FExpectMore%5FNYT%5FNYRegion

POC:
http://www.nytimes.com/adx/bin/adx_click.html?type=goto&opzn&page=www.nytimes.com/pages/nyregion/index.html&pos=SFMiddle&sn2=8dfce1f6/9926f9b3&sn1=bbba504f/c0de9221&camp=CouplesResorts_1918341&ad=NYRegionSF_Feb_300x250-B5732328.10663001&goto=http%3A%2F%2Fad%2Edoubleclick%2Enet%2Fddm%2Fclk%2F279541164%3B106630011%3Bs%3Fhttp%3A%2F%2Ftetraph%2Ecom%2Fblog%3F%2Dinclusive%2Ephp%3Futm%5Fsource%3Dnyt%26utm%5Fmedium%3Ddisplay%26utm%5Fcontent%3Dclicktracker%26utm%5Fcampaign%3D300x250%5FExpectMore%5FNYT%5FNYRegion


Blog Detail:
http://tetraph.blogspot.com/2014/05/nytimes-covert-redirect-vulnerability.html



(3) What is Covert Redirect?

Covert Redirect is a class of security bugs disclosed in May 2014. It is an application that takes a parameter and redirects a user to the parameter value without sufficient validation. This often makes use of Open Redirect and XSS vulnerabilities in third-party applications.

Covert Redirect is also related to single sign-on. It is known by its influence on OAuth and OpenID. Hacker may use it to steal users’ sensitive information. Almost all OAuth 2.0 and OpenID providers worldwide are affected. Covert Redirect was found and dubbed by a Mathematics PhD student Wang Jing from School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

After Covert Redirect was published, it is kept in some common databases such as SCIP, OSVDB, Bugtraq, and X-Force. Its scipID is 13185, while OSVDB reference number is 106567. Bugtraq ID: 67196. X-Force reference number is 93031.

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing

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eBay Covert Redirect Web Security Bugs Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

ebay-logo

eBay Covert Redirect Vulnerability Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

(1) WebSite:
ebay.com



“eBay Inc. (stylized as ebay, formerly eBay) is an American multinational corporation and e-commerce company, providing consumer to consumer & business to consumer sales services via Internet. It is headquartered in San Jose, California. eBay was founded by Pierre Omidyar in 1995, and became a notable success story of the dot-com bubble. Today, it is a multi-billion dollar business with operations localized in over thirty countries.

 

The company manages eBay.com, an online auction and shopping website in which people and businesses buy and sell a broad variety of goods and services worldwide. In addition to its auction-style sales, the website has since expanded to include “Buy It Now” shopping; shopping by UPC, ISBN, or other kind of SKU (via Half.com); online classified advertisements (via Kijiji or eBay Classifieds); online event ticket trading (via StubHub); online money transfers (via PayPal) and other services.” (Wikipedia)

 



(2) Vulnerability Description:

eBay web application has a computer cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Covert Redirect attacks.

The vulnerability occurs at “ebay.com/rover” page with “&mpre” parameter, i.e.

http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-67261-24966-0/2?mtid=691&kwid=1&crlp=1_263602&itemid=370825182102&mpre=http://www.google.com

The vulnerability can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Firefox (26.0) in Ubuntu (12.04) and IE (9.0.15) in Windows 7.


 

 

 

(2.1) When a user is redirected from eBay to another site, eBay will check whether the redirected URL belongs to domains in eBay’s whitelist, e.g.
google.com

If this is true, the redirection will be allowed.

 

However, if the URLs in a redirected domain have open URL redirection vulnerabilities themselves, a user could be redirected from eBay to a vulnerable URL in that domain first and later be redirected from this vulnerable site to a malicious site. This is as if being redirected from eBay directly.

 

One of the vulnerable domain is,
http://googleads.g.doubleclick.net (Google’s Ad system)

 

 

 

(2.2) Use one of webpages for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://itinfotech.tumblr.com/“. We can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

 

Vulnerable URL:

POC:

 

 

Poc Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4H-u17Y9ks

 

Blog Detail:
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2014/11/ebay-covert-redirect-vulnerability.html



 

 



(3) What is Covert Redirect?

Covert Redirect is a class of security bugs disclosed in May 2014. It is an application that takes a parameter and redirects a user to the parameter value without sufficient validation. This often makes use of Open Redirect and XSS vulnerabilities in third-party applications.

 

Covert Redirect is also related to single sign-on. It is known by its influence on OAuth and OpenID. Hacker may use it to steal users’ sensitive information. Almost all OAuth 2.0 and OpenID providers worldwide are affected. Covert Redirect was found and dubbed by a Mathematics PhD student Wang Jing from School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

After Covert Redirect was published, it is kept in some common databases such as SCIP, OSVDB, Bugtraq, and X-Force. Its scipID is 13185, while OSVDB reference number is 106567. Bugtraq ID: 67196. X-Force reference number is 93031.

 

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://tetraph.com/wangjing/

Google Covert Redirect Web Security Bugs Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

go

 

Bypass Google Open Redirect Filter Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

— Google Covert Redirect Vulnerability Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

 

 

 

(1) WebSite:
google.com

 

“Google is an American multinational technology company specializing in Internet-related services and products. These include online advertising technologies, search, cloud computing, and software. Most of its profits are derived from AdWords, an online advertising service that places advertising near the list of search results.

 

The corporation has been estimated to run more than one million servers in data centers around the world (as of 2007). It processes over one billion search requests and about 24 petabytes of user-generated data each day (as of 2009). In December 2013, Alexa listed google.com as the most visited website in the world. Numerous Google sites in other languages figure in the top one hundred, as do several other Google-owned sites such as YouTube and Blogger. Its market dominance has led to prominent media coverage, including criticism of the company over issues such as search neutrality, copyright, censorship, and privacy.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

(2) Vulnerability Description:

Google web application has a computer cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Covert Redirect attacks. 

The vulnerability exists at “Logout?” page with “&continue” parameter, i.e.

 
 


The vulnerabilities can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (10.0.9200.16750) of Windows 8, Mozilla Firefox (34.0) & Google Chromium 39.0.2171.65-0 ubuntu0.14.04.1.1064 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04),Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X Lion 10.7. 

 
 
 
 
 
 (2.1) When a user is redirected from Google to another site, Google will check whether the redirected URL belongs to domains in Google’s whitelist (The whitelist usually contains websites belong to Google), e.g.
docs.google.com
googleads.g.doubleclick.net

 
 
 

 

If this is true, the redirection will be allowed.

 

 

However, if the URLs in a redirected domain have open URL redirection  vulnerabilities themselves, a user could be redirected from Google to a vulnerable URL in that domain first and later be redirected from this vulnerable site to a malicious site. This is as if being redirected from Google directly.

 

 

One of the vulnerable domain is,
googleads.g.doubleclick.net (Google’s Ad System)

 
 
 
 

 

 

 

(2.2) Use one webpage for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope“. We can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Blog Detail:
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2014/11/covert-redirect-vulnerability-based-on.html

 

 

 

 

 

(3) What is Covert Redirect? 

Covert Redirect is a class of security bugs disclosed in May 2014. It is an application that takes a parameter and redirects a user to the parameter value without sufficient validation. This often makes use of Open Redirect and XSS vulnerabilities in third-party applications.

 

Covert Redirect is also related to single sign-on. It is known by its influence on OAuth and OpenID. Almost all OAuth 2.0 and OpenID providers worldwide are affected. Covert Redirect was found and dubbed by a Mathematics PhD student Wang Jing from School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

 

After Covert Redirect was published, it is kept in some common databases such as SCIP, OSVDB, Bugtraq, and X-Force. Its scipID is 13185, while OSVDB reference number is 106567. Bugtraq ID: 67196.  X-Force reference number is 93031.

 
 
 

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://tetraph.com/wangjing/

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

More Details:
http://computerobsess.blogspot.com/2014/11/google-covert-redirect-vulnerability.html
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2014/Nov/29
http://cxsecurity.com/issue/WLB-2014110106
http://tetraph.blog.163.com/blog/static/23460305120141145350181/
https://infoswift.wordpress.com/2014/05/25/google-web-security/
http://tetraph.tumblr.com/post/119490394042/securitypost#notes
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2014/11/covert-redirect-vulnerability-based-on.html
http://webtech.lofter.com/post/1cd3e0d3_706af10
https://twitter.com/tetraphibious/status/559165319575371776
http://tetraph.com/security/covert-redirect/google-based-on-googleads-g-doubleclick-net/
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/computer-security/google-covert-g-doubleclick-net/
https://hackertopic.wordpress.com/2014/05/25/google-web-security/

 
 

Amazon Covert Redirect Bug Based on Kindle Daily Post, Omnivoracious, Car Lust

Anonymous-hackers

 

Amazon Covert Redirect Bug Based on Kindle Daily Post, Omnivoracious, Car Lust

— Amazon Covert Redirect Based on Kindle Daily Post, Omnivoracious, Car Lust & kindlepost.com omnivoracious.com carlustblog.com Open Redirect Web Security Vulnerabilities

“Amazon.com, Inc. (/ˈæməzɒn/ or /ˈæməzən/) is an American electronic commerce company with headquarters in Seattle, Washington. It is the largest Internet-based retailer in the United States. Amazon.com started as an online bookstore, but soon diversified, selling DVDs, Blu-rays, CDs, video downloads/streaming, MP3 downloads/streaming, software, video games, electronics, apparel, furniture, food, toys and jewelry. The company also produces consumer electronics—notably, Amazon Kindle e-book readers, Fire tablets, Fire TV and Fire Phone — and is a major provider of cloud computing services. Amazon also sells certain low-end products like USB cables under its inhouse brand AmazonBasics. Amazon has separate retail websites for United States, United Kingdom & Ireland, France, Canada, Germany, The Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Australia, Brazil, Japan, China, India and Mexico. Amazon also offers international shipping to certain other countries for some of its products. In 2011, it had professed an intention to launch its websites in Poland and Sweden.” (Wikipedia)

 

All kindlepost.com, omnivoracious.com, carlustblog.com are websites belonging to Amazon.

“The Kindle Post keeps Kindle customers up-to-date on the latest Kindle news and information and passes along fun reading recommendations, author interviews, and more.”

“Omnivoracious is a blog run by the books editors at Amazon.com. We aim to share our passion for the written word through news, reviews, interviews, and more. This is our space to talk books and publishing frankly and we welcome participation through comments. Please visit often or add us to your favorite RSS reader to keep up on the latest information.”

“Car Lust is, very simply, where interesting cars meet irrational emotion. It’s a deeply personal exploration of the hidden gems of the automotive world; a twisted look into a car nut’s mind; and a quirky look at the broader automotive universe – a broader universe that lies beneath the new, the flashy, and the trendy represented in the car magazines.”

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)

Vulnerabilities Description:

Amazon has a computer bug security problem. Both Amazon itself and its websites are vulnerable to different kind of attacks. This allows hackers to do phishing attacks to Amazon users.

 

When a user is redirected from amazon to another site, amazon will check a variable named “token”. Every redirected website will be given one token. This idea is OK. However, all URLs related to the redirected website use the same token. This means if the authenticated site itself has Open Redirect vulnerabilities. Then victims can be redirected to any site from Amazon.

 

The program code flaw can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (9 9.0.8112.16421) of Windows 7, Mozilla Firefox (37.0.2) & Google Chromium 42.0.2311 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04.2),Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X v10.9 Mavericks.

Use a website for the following tests. The website is “http://www.diebiyi.com/articles“. Suppose this website is malicious,

 

 


(1) Kindle Daily Post Open Redirect & Amazon Covert Redirect Based on kindlepost.com

(1.1) Kindle Daily Post Open Redirect Security Vulnerability

Vulnerable Links:

Poc:

 

 

(1.2) Amazon Covert Redirect Based on kindlepost.com

Vulnerable URL of Amazon:

POC:

 

 

kindlepost_com

 

 

 

(2) Omnivoracious Open Redirect & Amazon Covert Redirect Based on omnivoracious.com

(2.1) Omnivoracious Open Redirect Security Vulnerability

Vulnerable Links:

POC:

 

 

(2.2) Amazon Covert Redirect Based on omnivoracious.com

Vulnerable URL:

POC:

 

 

omnivoracious_com

 

 

 

(3) Car Lust Open Redirect & Amazon Covert Redirect Based on carlustblog.com

(3.1) Car Lust Open Redirect Security Vulnerability

Vulnerable Links:

POC:

 

 

(3.2) Amazon Covert Redirect Based on carlustblog.com

Vulnerable URL:

POC:

 

 

carlustblog_com

 

 

 

Vulnerabilities Disclosure:

The vulnerabilities were reported to Amazon in 2014. Amazon has patch the vulnerabilities.

 

 

 

 

Related Articles:
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2015/Jan/23
http://lists.openwall.net/full-disclosure/2015/01/12/2
http://www.tetraph.com/blog/computer-security/amazon-covert-redirect/
https://progressive-comp.com/?l=full-disclosure&m=142104346821481&w=1
http://computerobsess.blogspot.com/2015/06/amazon-covert-redirect_17.html
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/1429
http://tetraph.blog.163.com/blog/static/23460305120155176411897/
http://diebiyi.com/articles/security/amazon-covert-redirect/
https://itswift.wordpress.com/2015/01/17/amazon-covert-redirect/
http://marc.info/?l=full-disclosure&m=142104346821481&w=4
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2015/01/amazon-covert-redirec
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/computer-web-security/amazon-covert-redirect/

XSS攻撃に対して脆弱先立ち2013年にニューヨーク·タイムズ紙の記事へのすべてのリンク

XSS攻撃に対して脆弱先立ち2013年にニューヨーク·タイムズ紙の記事へのすべてのリンク

 

 

2013の前に公開されたニューヨーク·タイムズ(NYT)の資料へのURLは、Webブラウザのコンテキストで実行されるコードを提供できるXSS(クロスサイトスクリプティング)攻撃に対して脆弱であることが見出されている。

 

NYTimesのの設計に基づいて、ほぼ2013年前にすべてのURLが(記事のすべてのページを)影響を受けます。実際には、「印刷」ボタン、「単一ページ」ボタンを含むすべての記事ページには、「ページ*」ボタン、「次ページ」ボタンが影響を受けます。

 

324748_1280x720

 

NYTimesのは、そのサーバに送信されたURLを復号化し、2013年以来、このメカニズムを変更しました。これは今メカニズムはるかに安全になります。

 

し かし、2013年前にすべてのURLは古いメカニズムを使用しています。これは2013年前にほとんどすべての記事ページはまだXSS攻撃に対して脆弱で あることを意味します。私はNYTimesの前にURLをフィルタリングしない理由はコストだと思います。それは前にすべての投稿記事のデータベースを変 更する(マネー&人的資本)あまりかかります。

 

この脆弱性は、物理の学校と数理科学(SPMS)、南洋理工大学、シンガポールから数学の博士課程の学生によって(Wang Jing) 発見されました。

 

王によって与えられたPOCとブログの説明、
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RekCK5tjXWQ
http://tetraph.com/security/xss-vulnerability/new-york-times-nytimes-com-page-design-xss-vulnerability-almost-all-article-pages-are-affected/

 

 

一方、王は「ニューヨーク·タイムズ紙は、これはより良い保護メカニズムです。今新しいメカニズムを採用しています。」と述べた

 

記事が古い場合でも、ページがまだ関連しています
最近の記事への攻撃は間違いなく大きな影響を持っていただろうが、2012年、あるいはそれ以上の年齢の記事は廃止されてから遠く離れている。彼らはまだ攻撃の文脈において関連があるでしょう。

 

サイバー犯罪者は、高い成功率、すべての複数と標的型攻撃を潜在的な被害者へのリンクを送信し、記録するさまざまな方法を考案することができる。

 

XSSとは何ですか?
ク ロスサイトスクリプティング(XSS)は、典型的には、Webアプリケーションで見つかったコンピュータセキュリティの脆弱性の一種です。 XSSは、他のユーザが閲覧するWebページにクライアント側のスクリプトを注入するために、攻撃を可能にします。クロスサイトスクリプティングの脆弱性 は、同一生成元ポリシーとしてアクセス制御をバイパスするために攻撃者によって使用されてもよい。ウェブサイト上で行わクロスサイトスクリプティングは、 2007年のようにSymantecが文書化されたすべてのセキュリティ脆弱性の約84%を占めた(ウィキペディア)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Otra brecha de seguridad amenaza parte de Internet

Un nuevo fallo de seguridad amenaza Internet. En este caso se trata de Covert Redirect y ha sido descubierto por un estudiante chino en Singapur. Las empresas tienen en sus manos solucionar este problema.

encrypt

 

Cuando aún resuenan los ecos de Heartbleed y el terremoto que sacudió la red, nos acabamos de enterar que otra brecha de seguridad compromete Internet. En este caso se trata de un fallo que afecta a páginas como Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Linkedin, Yahoo, PayPal, GitHub o Mail.ru que usan estas herramientas de código abierto para autenticar a sus usuarios.

 

Este error permitiría a un atacante haga creer a un usuario que una nueva ventana que redirija a Facebook es segura cuando en realidad no lo es. Hasta aquí la técnica se parece al phishing pero lo que hace lo hace diferente es que Covert Redirect, que así se llama el nuevo exploit, usa el dominio real pero hace un bypass del servidor para conseguir la info. Lo mejor que podemos hacer cuando estemos navegando y pulsemos en un sitio que abre un pop up que nos pide logearnos en Facebook o Google es cerrar esa ventana para evitar que nos redirija a sitios sospechosos.

 

Wang Jing, estudiante de doctorado en la Universidad Técnica de Nanyang (Singapur), es quien ha descubierto la vulnerabilidad y le ha puesto nombre. El problema, según Jing, es que ni el proveedor ni la compañía quieren responsabilizarse de esta brecha ya que costaría mucho tiempo y dinero. Seguramente, ahora que se conoce el caso, las compañías se pondrán manos a la obra.

 

Artículos Relacionados:

Falha de segurança afetam logins de Facebook, Google e Microsoft

covert_redirect3

Um estudante de PHD de Singapura, Wang Jing, identificou a falha, chamada de “Covert Redirect”, que consegue usar domínios reais de sites para verificação de páginas de login falsas, enganando os internautas.

 

Os cibercriminosos podem criar links maliciosos para abrir janelas pop-up do Facebook pedindo que o tal aplicativo seja autorizado. Caso seja realizada esta sincronização, os dados pessoais dos usuários serão passados para os hackers.

 

Wang afirma que já entrou em contato com o Facebook, porém recebeu uma resposta de que “entende os riscos de estar associado ao OAuth 2.0″ e que corrigir a falha “é algo que não pode ser feito por enquanto”.

 

O Google afirmou que o problema está sendo rastreado, o LinkedIn publicou nota em que garante que já tomou medidas para evitar que a falha seja explorada, e a Microsoft negou que houvesse vulnerabilidade em suas páginas, apenas nas de terceiros.

 

A recomendação do descobridor da falha para os internautas é que evitem fazer o login com dados de confirmação de Facebook, Google ou qualquer outro serviço sem terem total certeza de que estão em um ambiente seguro.

 

 

Especialistas: erro é difícil de corrigir

O site CNET ouviu dois especialistas em segurança virtual sobre o assunto. Segundo Jeremiah Grossman, fundador e CEO interino da WhiteHat Security, afirma que a falha “não é fácil de corrigir”. Segundo Chris Wysopal, diretor da Veracode, a falha pode enganar muita gente.

 

“A confiança que os usuários dão ao Facebook e outros serviços que usam OAuth pode tornar mais fácil para os hackers enganarem as pessoas para que elas acabem dando suas informações pessoais a ele”, afirma Wsyopal.

 

 

 

notícias relacionadas: